Category: book links


It’s been a long and ongoing effort learning the ropes on PHP and MySQL. This week  I concentrated on a few aspects of my website.

  • I wanted existing clients to have their a simplified version login
  • I want them to change a form to their most current info – e.g.  company website, phone #, email address, etc.
  • I want them to access their exclusive page to review their in-progress images with a comment box which would send comments right to the company email inbox.
  • And of course I want them to logout.

Like CSS, only more intensive – PHP needs hours of research and implementation. Plus, to preview pages containing server-side code, you have an extra step to specify the server. It was fun to see how other websites used the PHP script. You have a question: the answer is on the web…somewhere!!! You only have to keep looking! 🙂

I am still in the process of tweaking my website but I got the website workable to submit for this week and good enough to get a jumpstart on the tweaks. Hopefully I should be able to get some tweaks done before I hand out the testing plan to my eager testers!

I did mention in one of my previous emails that I would review the book, Build Your Own Database Driven Web Site Using PHP & MySQL, 4th Edition
http://www.sitepoint.com/books/phpmysql4/?historicredirect=phpmysql1

I think it’s a good book if you have some experience with PHP. For beginners, I would recommend Head First PHP & MySQL for some general concepts or techniques (http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfphp/).

The major chunk of learning the language comes by searching codes on the internet and looking through web links, articles and blogs. Below are a few links for PHP/MySQL :

Please feel to add-on if you have links to share.

Have fun celebrating July 4th – have a great long weekend!

Times just whizzing by…so much to do and so little time! I’ve been sneaking-a-peek at this book from the library, Build your own database driven website using PHP & MYSQL by Kevin Yank. I am liking what I am reading – the language is simple. It provides what the author quotes, “a hands-on look at what’s involved in building a database driven web site using PHP and MySQL“. I’ll provide updates as I cover more of the book.

More on the articles Adam provided:

http://www.seochat.com/c/a/Choosing-Keywords-Help/Choosing-Keywords-Wisely/

http://www.avangate.com/articles/keyword-research_40.htm

I enjoyed both articles – a special mention to article #2 (16 Rules of Thumb) for how to choose keywords effectively. Today’s world of websites is aiming to use search engines optimization from the beginning, for new websites, especially like mine. It was harder a few years back but with technology like Google AdWords and Analytics, the internet is becoming an easy tool. For the older websites, it’s still a good insight into what recovery measures can be undertaken. SEO is becoming a powerful industry by itself and what made the articles worthwhile were the use of keyword terms like density,  localization, placement, conversion rate and primary & secondary keywords.

I also looked up and tried my keywords in Google Trends. Google Trends also shows how frequently your topics have appeared in Google News stories, and in which geographic regions people have searched for them most. If you have a global market which is also a potential market for my website, it was fun to see what kind of words/terms were used differently in different countries and how that would also help framing my website’s  content.

Coming to the “Content” part – here were the list of articles –

http://www.clickz.com/3617566
http://www.clickz.com/3625220
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/zombiecopy

You would be amazed to think that content does not have to be only thought of from the client’s perspective, but also from an SEO one! Your website is not yours anymore – this is what you get for current trends in internet marketing and globalization…lol. P. J. Fusco, the author of one of the articles quotes:

Good content contributes to a site’s overall visibility on a page-by-page basis. It engages users and provides an optimal path for easy navigation throughout the site. It stays on theme and naturally accrues inbound links over time.

Great content maintains all the essential elements of good content but produces higher conversion rates. It’s action-oriented in that it inspires users to make a purchase, request more information, sign up for a newsletter, make a reservation, or set up an appointment.

It calls for the ability to Analyze, Implement, and Measure content. We also need to keep in mind that people don’t read every word of your content, keeping it concise helps. I really wish I had the skills of a copy-writer, right now 😦

Wish me good luck!

I am referring to the Web development process, very often referred to as the six-stage process:

We learned this as a part of John Horn’s “Starting and Running a Successful Website” course and it makes it easier to break down this HUGE task of creating a website so easy.

  • Assessment (preliminary questionnaire, competitor analysis)
  • Analysis and Planning (site goals, target audience, roles and scope)
  • Design (Main template, content, site map)
  • Production (drafts with page look and feel and functional aspects)
  • Testing and Publish (functional, usability testing, etc)
  • Maintenance (SEO, visitor tracking, analytics, etc.)

I am in the process of reading Web ReDesign 2.0: Workflow that Works (http://www.web-redesign.com/) and it too does a great job to explain this.

The other links I found on these are:

http://www.quantumcloud.com/web-design-process.php
http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements.pdf
http://www.webdesignfromscratch.com/design-process/web-design-process/